911 call released in teen's drug overdose

By Amaka Ubaka, Reporter, aubaka@wkmg.com
Published On: Feb 16 2013 12:07:05 AM EST
Updated On: Feb 16 2013 03:01:11 AM EST

The Orange County Sheriff's Office have released the 911 call surrounding the group of teens who overdosed on an unknown substance early Sunday morning.

WINTER GARDEN, Fla. -

The Orange County Sheriff's Office have released the 911 call surrounding the group of teens who overdosed on an unknown substance early Sunday morning.

Officials said it took deputies more than twenty minutes to arrive on scene. Once they arrived, deputies said they found four teens unconscious. One of them, Krystopher Sansone, later died.

On the 911 call, you can hear a woman who was inside the house when it happened, so scared of what was happening that she locked herself in her bedroom inside.

"They're all over my house," said the woman. "I'm scared. I don't know what's going on. I'm scared they're going to hurt me. Please help."

The woman described a chaotic scene to the dispatcher. Her brother-in-law and some of his friends were hanging out on the front porch, until she said they took some kind of drug that turned them violent.

Six minutes into the call, you can hear the woman say "Oh my God, they're banging on my door. I need help please." The dispatcher responded, "They are coming as fast as they can."

At fourteen minutes, it's clear the woman is frustrated with the dispatcher, as one of her other roommates works to calm down the group.

"Can you please tell me where they are at?" said the woman. The dispatcher told her "I don't know their exact location. All I know is they are coming as fast as they can and they are on their way to you."

Officials said four deputies were in route coming from 9100 International Drive after responding to a fight call, which was 17 miles away. One deputy arrived 18 minutes into the call, but had to wait for backup. Three minutes after that, the other deputies finally arrived.

Captain Angelo Nieves tells Local 6 that five minutes is the average time it takes to respond to a high priority call like this one.

Nieves insists that the deputies did all they could to arrive on scene fast enough, pointing out the call was dispatched in 30 seconds.

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