Over 120 rescues made off Volusia beaches

By Erik Sandoval, Reporter, esandoval@wkmg.com
Lisa McDonald, Assignment Editor, lmcdonald@wkmg.com
Published On: May 25 2014 04:28:52 PM EDT
Updated On: May 26 2014 06:44:34 PM EDT

Volusia County lifeguards are warning people about dangerous rip currents this holiday weekend.

VOLUSIA COUNTY, Fla. -

Memorial Day weekend is one of the busiest times of the year for Volusia County beaches and the Beach Patrol is warning about dangerous rip currents.

Volusia County Beach Patrol said they are flying red flags as a warning to beachgoers that conditions in the water are dangerous.

By Monday evening, 30 people were rescued after being pulled underwater by rip currents, including a boy who was able to walk away from close call.

"I just had to get my son out of the water before something like that happened to him," said one parent, who watched as the lifeguards swam toward the boy.

A team of more than six lifeguards jumped into the waters off Daytona Beach to rescue the boy.

"Thank God the lifeguards were able to get to him because if he got too far out, the tides would have taken him under," said another parent.

Immediately after the rescue, lifeguards at Daytona Beach ordered everyone out of the water and limited swimmers to going in waist-deep for the rest of the day.

On Sunday, more than 100 rescues were made, officials said.

According to NOAA, rip currents are the most dangerous conditions that beachgoers face.

Lifeguards stressed the importance of keeping tabs on the flags that fly at the lifeguard stations. If they are red, lifeguards urge swimmers to only go in waist deep.

Volusia County beaches are fully staffed and all the lifeguard stations will be manned during the holiday weekend.

Stay with Local 6 for the latest on this story.

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